herbal fare

The exquisite pleasure of figs

I live in a house of non-foodies. I shouldn’t complain too much. My husband and teenage son will both eat things like Brussels sprouts and endive. They both appreciate fresh well-prepared foods. My son will even eat salmon and sushi. (My husband never eats fish. Ever.)

But cheeses? Fuhgeddaboudit. Both hardly tolerate anything wilder than cheddar, Monterey Jack and Parmesan. Goat cheese? Blue cheese? Feta? Not going to happen. (In fact, the night I served them fried goat cheese with frisee will live on in infamy.)

Figs? Nope. Not going to happen either. Which is fine with me. The fig tree is mine. All Mine. I can pick and eat all the figs I want, give away what I know I can’t eat and let the birds have the rest.

“To eat figs off the tree in the very early morning, when they have been barely touched by the sun, is one of the exquisite pleasures of the Mediterranean.”  ~ Elizabeth David, An Omelette and a Glass of Wine.

Thankfully, fig trees grow and produce extremely well in North Texas, so we can have that touch of exquisite pleasure from the Mediterranean, too. Eating a fig fresh from the tree, like eating a tomato right off the stem, really is a gardener’s delight.

fig rocker

Since I am the only one in this household that eats figs, I look for recipes that I can easily make as an individual serving or freeze portions of individually. This fig tart recipe was easily quartered for the perfect lunch-size portion.

fig tart

Fig Tarts with Honey and Herbs
Makes four tarts

Dough:
1/4 cup corn meal
1 cup all purpose flour (I used gluten-free flour from King Arthur brand)
Pinch of sea salt
4 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cut into pieces
8 ounces cold cream cheese

Toppings:
24 small to medium figs
honey
1-2 ounces creamy goat cheese
fresh herbs, washed and chopped fine (I used a mixture of thyme and chives, but rosemary would also be nice)

In a food processor, mix together the corn meal, flour and salt. Add the butter and cream cheese and blend in the food processor until a ball of dough forms.

Separate the dough into four equal portions and place in refrigerator for about one hour. (Can be kept up to three days.)

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out each ball of dough until it is about 7 inches across. Transfer the crusts onto the baking sheets and fold up a small edge of dough.

To prepare figs, wash and trim stem end from figs. Slice fruit into quarters. Place figs onto the prepared crusts. Drizzle honey over the figs, then crumble on goat cheese, as desired. Sprinkle with fresh herbs.

Bake 25-30 minutes, rotating baking sheets half way through.

(Since I was making this for lunch, I added a bit of sauteed shallot and pancetta to the crust before topping with the figs.)

1 thought on “The exquisite pleasure of figs”

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